Aboriginal Suicide Is Different: A Portrait of Life and by Colin Tatz

By Colin Tatz

Adopting a ancient and anthropological method of suicide in Australia and New Zealand, this examine records the speed of suicide between Aboriginal humans, that is one of the world’s highest.

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Aboriginal Suicide Is Different: A Portrait of Life and Self-Destruction

Adopting a historic and anthropological method of suicide in Australia and New Zealand, this examine files the speed of suicide between Aboriginal humans, that's one of the world’s optimum.

Extra resources for Aboriginal Suicide Is Different: A Portrait of Life and Self-Destruction

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Darwin Aborigines own a television station; an Aboriginal radio station broadcasts from Alice Springs. Aboriginal programs feature nation-wide on ABC and SBS radio and television. On occasion, even the commercial channels offer positive programs. Black artists, writers, theatre and dancing groups are not only recognised, but lauded. 7 The presence of ten Aborigines in the national Olympic team in 2000 certainly ‘lifted the profile’. There is growing Aboriginal participation in political and parliamentary life, and greater local decision-making than before.

There is growing Aboriginal participation in political and parliamentary life, and greater local decision-making than before. Most states have passed antidiscrimination legislation. Aborigines have discovered that they have a greater chance of recovering or establishing rights through the legal rather than through the political system, and have won 16 of their last 23 forays before the High Court. Aborigines are now part of the national agenda and are no longer relegated, as over the last 150 years, to being ‘merely’ a welfare problem.

Read 1983, esp. 8–9). Read’s estimate of the number of children removed in New South Wales between 1883 and 1969 is 5625, allowing (as he notes) for the distinct ‘lack of records’. My assessment is much higher. I have not examined the remaining Board or child welfare records. I base my figure on an extrapolation of the numbers of forced removals and institutionalisation among the 1200 Aboriginal sportspeople recorded in my 1995 book on the Aboriginal experience as seen through the metaphor of sport.

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